World

He knew he fucked up

Donald Trump is turning on even his most devoted allies

Increasingly isolated, the president has lashed out at loyalists like Newsmax’s Chris Ruddy — “I could move your audience in a heartbeat” — and had to be pushed by advisers and allies, including Lindsey Graham, to call for a “smooth” transition as 25th Amendment and impeachment talk intensifies.

COVID-19: Donald Trump

President Trump has been lying about his health for years

President Trump has been misleading the public about his own health ever since he issued an obviously bogus doctor’s note early on in his first run for president. Now, after years of overstating his own physical fitness and months of severely downplaying the threat of the coronavirus, Trump’s second campaign rests on asking Americans to take his word about his health. Trump’s late-night tweet announcing his positive COVID-19 diagnosis threw his campaign and presidency into unpredictable chaos.

Republican National Convention

5 winners and 2 losers from the RNC’s first night

The first night of the 2020 Republican National Convention is in the books. The event was supposed to be in Charlotte, North Carolina (then Jacksonville, Florida), but mostly featured speeches delivered from a podium in Washington, DC. It felt a little odd, and not just because of the virus-required distancing.

Trump's blessing

Wave of extremist Republicans run for office

When Donald Trump congratulated Laura Loomer, an Islamophobe and conspiracy theorist, on her Republican congressional primary victory this week, it seemed to bring the president’s version of the Republican party full-circle to the start of his rise.

'Conmen, grifters and criminals'

Why is Trump's circle so at odds with the law?

To live outside the law, Bob Dylan sang, you must be honest. It also helps, apparently, to stay as clear as possible from Donald Trump, whose inner circle of advisers has suffered steady attrition since 2017, through a series of encounters with the criminal justice system.

Facebook

Algorithm found to 'actively promote' Holocaust denial

Facebook’s algorithm “actively promotes” Holocaust denial content according to an analysis that will increase pressure on the social media giant to remove antisemitic content relating to the Nazi genocide.

From Oakland to the White House?

The rise of Kamala Harris

Bancroft Way in Berkeley, California, is quaint and slow, the kind of street where everyone seems to know each other by name. This week, neighbors sat outdoors drinking wine under the evening sun, as they chatted animatedly about their childhood companion who had just become headline news.

Shortnews

Pompeo scraps trip

EU leader calls Trump 'political pyromaniac'

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has cancelled a trip to Europe at the last minute after European officials were publicly critical of Donald Trump’s role in last week’s storming of the Capitol. The official reason for the cancellation of the trip, originally to Brussels and Luxembourg, was the need to coordinate with a transition team from the incoming Biden administration, but it comes after the unprecedented attack on American democracy that stunned many world leaders and US allies.

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Pompeo scraps trip

EU leader calls Trump 'political pyromaniac'

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has cancelled a trip to Europe at the last minute after European officials were publicly critical of Donald Trump’s role in last week’s storming of the Capitol. The official reason for the cancellation of the trip, originally to Brussels and Luxembourg, was the need to coordinate with a transition team from the incoming Biden administration, but it comes after the unprecedented attack on American democracy that stunned many world leaders and US allies.

The Luxembourg leg of the trip was called off on Monday after its foreign minister Jean Asselborn called Trump “criminal” for inciting the attack.

Asselborn described the outgoing US president to RTL radio as a “political pyromaniac who must be brought before a court”.

Reuters and Fox News both quoted diplomatic sources as saying it was Luxembourg that had called off the meeting, a devastating snub from a tiny country for a secretary of state that continually claims to have restored “swagger” to the state department.

Pompeo was also due to meet the Belgian deputy prime minister and foreign minister, Sophie Wilmes, who tweeted while the assault in Washington was underway, “These images are shocking, also because they hurt our democratic ideals.”

“They show the extent of President-elect Biden’s task, which will be to unite American society around a common project. We trust him to do that.”

Jens Stoltenberg, the Nato secretary general, who was due to have a dinner with Pompeo had described the scenes in Washington as “shocking” and said: “The outcome of this democratic election must be respected.” A Nato spokesperson confirmed that Pompeo had cancelled on Tuesday, giving as a reason the need to focus on the transition.

Reuters reported that EU officials had declined to meet Pompeo on his last foreign trip, but a EU spokesperson denied there had been any plan or request for meetings with EU leaders.

The state department, in a statement, attributed the cancellation to transition work before President-elect Joe Biden takes office on 20 January, even if until recently Pompeo had been reluctant to unequivocally recognise Biden’s win. Also on Tuesday, the US Ambassador to the United Nations Kelly Craft cancelled a planned visit to Taiwan.

The state department declined further comment on European officials’ rejection of meetings with Pompeo.

The cold shoulder was a contrast with Pompeo’s previous visits to Brussels, which is home to Nato and EU headquarters, over the past three years, where he has given key-note speeches on US policy and met the EU’s chief executive, even as Europe balked at Trump’s foreign policy.

Nancy Pelosi

Trump should be removed immediately

Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said Thursday that Washington policymakers should act immediately to remove President Trump from office just two weeks before his term ends, citing "seditious" acts related to the president's role in encouraging the assault on the U.S. Capitol a day earlier. Pelosi said Vice President Mike Pence should invoke the 25th Amendment to remove Trump immediately. Short of that, she said, the House will impeach him for a second time.

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Nancy Pelosi

Trump should be removed immediately

Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said Thursday that Washington policymakers should act immediately to remove President Trump from office just two weeks before his term ends, citing "seditious" acts related to the president's role in encouraging the assault on the U.S. Capitol a day earlier.

Pelosi said Vice President Mike Pence should invoke the 25th Amendment to remove Trump immediately. Short of that, she said, the House will impeach him for a second time.

"Yesterday the president of the United States incited an armed insurrection against America," Pelosi told reporters in the Capitol.

"The gleeful desecration of the U.S. Capitol, which is the temple of our American democracy, and the violence targeting Congress are horrors that will forever stain our nation's history — instigated by the president."

Pelosi characterized Trump's role in his supporters' storming of the Capitol as "a seditious act" and called on Pence and other members of the president's cabinet to join forces to remove Trump from office, despite his short time left in office.

"This is an urgency of the highest magnitude," Pelosi said.

“While there are only 13 days left, any day can be a horror show for America,” she added.

In the wake of Wednesday's extraordinary events, Pelosi called on the resignation of the chief of the Capitol Police, Steven Sund. And she announced that the House Sergeant-at-Arms, Paul Irving, has already delivered his intention to resign.

CBS News poll

Biden leads Trump Arizona, Minnesota

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden gained a small lead over President Trump in the battleground state of Arizona and holds a larger 9-point lead over the president in Minnesota, according to a new poll. Biden is backed by 47 percent of likely voters in Arizona, compared to Trump’s 44 percent, according to a CBS News poll released Sunday. Biden’s 3-point lead is within the poll’s margin error. Biden has gained on Trump in Arizona since a similar poll conducted in July found the race tied, with 46 percent of likely voters backing both candidates.

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CBS News poll

Biden leads Trump Arizona, Minnesota

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden gained a small lead over President Trump in the battleground state of Arizona and holds a larger 9-point lead over the president in Minnesota, according to a new poll. Biden is backed by 47 percent of likely voters in Arizona, compared to Trump’s 44 percent, according to a CBS News poll released Sunday. Biden’s 3-point lead is within the poll’s margin error. Biden has gained on Trump in Arizona since a similar poll conducted in July found the race tied, with 46 percent of likely voters backing both candidates.

The survey also found half of Arizona voters said they think Biden would do a better job handling the coronavirus outbreak, with 50 percent saying Biden would handle the outbreak better compared to 37 percent who said the same about Trump.

Biden also leads when asked who would make voters feel more safe, with 46 percent saying Biden and 41 percent saying Trump. The candidates were about even when asked who would do a better job handling the economy, with 45 percent saying Trump and 44 percent saying Biden, based on the poll.

In Minnesota, a state Trump narrowly lost in 2016, Biden is backed by 50 percent of likely voters, based on the poll. The survey found 41 percent of likely voters said they would vote for Trump.

Biden again led Trump when asked about the coronavirus outbreak, with 50 percent saying Biden would do a better job handling the outbreak and 36 percent saying Trump would. Additionally, 47 percent of voters in Minnesota said Biden would make them feel more safe and 42 percent said the same about Trump.

Trump has a lead over Biden when asked about handling the economy. Forty-eight percent of likely voters in Minnesota said Trump would do a better job handling the economy and 44 percent said Biden, based on the poll.

The surveys were conducted on behalf of CBS News by YouGov between Sept. 9 to Sept. 11. The Arizona poll is based on 1,22 registered votes and the margin of error is 3.8 percentage points. The Minnesota poll is based on 1,100 registered voters and has a margin of error of 3.6 percentage points.

Peter Strzok

Donald Trump is compromised by the Russians

Former FBI agent Peter Strzok told NBC’s Chuck Todd Sunday that he still believes President Trump to be “compromised by the Russians...I believed at the time in 2016 and I continue to believe that Donald Trump is compromised by the Russians,” Strzok said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “And when I say that I mean that they hold leverage over him that makes him incapable of placing the national interest, the national security ahead of his own.”

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Peter Strzok

Donald Trump is compromised by the Russians

Former FBI agent Peter Strzok told NBC’s Chuck Todd Sunday that he still believes President Trump to be “compromised by the Russians...I believed at the time in 2016 and I continue to believe that Donald Trump is compromised by the Russians,” Strzok said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “And when I say that I mean that they hold leverage over him that makes him incapable of placing the national interest, the national security ahead of his own.”

“One of the largest ways that people in foreign governments gain leverage, certainly in the case of the president, is through financial entanglements,” he added. “And I think when you take a look at the Trump financial enterprise, particularly its relationship with Russian, with Russian monies and potentially those related to organized crime and other elements, that those interactions have placed him in a position where the Russians have leverage over him and are able to influence his actions.”

Todd also questioned Strzok about the text messages between himself and FBI attorney Lisa Page, with whom he had an affair. Todd asked Strzok whether he blamed himself for “putt[ing] [himself] in a compromising position” or whether he believed he was treated unfairly.

“I certainly regret sending the text messages that were absolutely weaponized and used to bludgeon the work of the FBI, the work of the special counsel, I'll always regret that,” Strzok conceded.

However, he claimed that “the way that those were weaponized” was part of an ongoing pattern of the Trump administration purging dissenters.

“Whether it is in the impeachment hearings with regard to Ukraine, the whistleblower, or anybody in any number of federal government agencies - if somebody dares speak the truth about this administration, this administration has shown no boundaries in going after people in ways that frankly is shocking, are shocking and are inappropriate,” he said.

Election 2020

Trump says he'll put personal money into campaign

President Trump said Tuesday that he would spend his own money on his reelection campaign if it were necessary, while downplaying the need for it at this stage. “If I have to, I would, but we’re doing very well,” Trump told reporters at Joint Base Andrews before departing for a two-state trip to Florida and North Carolina. The president claimed that his campaign needed to “spend more money up front” to combat what he described as “disinformation” put forth by Democrats and the press about his administration’s handling of the novel coronavirus.

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Election 2020

Trump says he'll put personal money into campaign

President Trump said Tuesday that he would spend his own money on his reelection campaign if it were necessary, while downplaying the need for it at this stage. “If I have to, I would, but we’re doing very well,” Trump told reporters at Joint Base Andrews before departing to Florida and North Carolina. Trump claimed that his campaign needed to “spend more money up front” to combat what he described as “disinformation” put forth by Democrats and the press about his administration’s handling of the novel coronavirus.

“If we needed any more, I would put it up personally, like I did in the primaries last time,” Trump told reporters, referring to the money he put up for his 2016 campaign. “If I have to, I’ll do it here but we don’t have to because we have double and maybe even triple what we had a number of years ago, four years ago.”

Asked how much of his own money he would consider putting into the campaign, Trump replied: “Whatever it takes, we have to win.”

Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden are entering the final two-month stretch of the 2020 presidential election, with national polls showing the former vice president leading the incumbent president by significant margins.

The president’s remarks come amid reports about concerns within his campaign about a potential cash crunch two months from the election. Bloomberg reported earlier Tuesday that Trump had discussed spending up to $100 million of his own money on his 2020 campaign.

The Trump campaign and Republican National Committee built a significant war chest but have spent $800 million on the president’s reelection effort through the month of July.

Meanwhile, the Biden campaign has spent more than $400 million and nearly matched the Trump campaign in cash on hand at the end of July. The campaign and the Democratic National Committee reported last week that they raised a record $365 million in August, the largest-ever one-month fundraising haul.

The New York Times reported Monday that the Trump campaign was grappling with a potential cash crunch as the Nov. 3 election nears. The Trump campaign and RNC have yet to announce their fundraising numbers for last month, though they have disclosed that they raised $76 million during the GOP convention alone, more than the Democrats.

Meanwhile, Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien told reporters that he is “carefully managing the budget” and that the campaign is confident funding will not be an issue down the final stretch.

Earlier Tuesday, Trump defended his campaign spending, tweeting that he needed to spend “a lot of money” in order to “compensate for the false reporting and Fake News concerning our handling of the China Virus,” referring to the coronavirus pandemic.

“Now they see the GREAT job we have done, and we have 3 times more than we had 4 years ago - & are up in polls. Lots of $’s & ENERGY!” Trump tweeted.